View from Raghly Harbour

 
 
I took this photograph near the harbour at Raghly in North Sligo just before sunset in March 2012.  The shot was taken from the water’s edge looking south-east towards Strandhill village and Coney Island.   Raghly has some of the best coastal views to be found anywhere in Ireland and leaves a photographer spoilt for choice. 
The last light of the evening sun created a lovely warm glow on the face of Knocknarea mountain.   Knocknarea is 327m high and is caped by a very impressive cairn which is over 10m high, one of the largest tombs of this type in Ireland. This cairn is know as Queen Meave's Grave and said to be the burial place of the legendary warrior Queen Meave of Connaught, buried upright on her horse in full battle regalia and facing her enemies from the north.  
To the left of this photograph you can see Oyster Island Lighthouse which is just off the coast at Rosses Point and was built in 1932. Oyster Island sits just off the coast from Rosses Point and got its name from the many oyster beds that were to be found along its shores until the end of the 19th Century.
Raghly Harbour itself was built in c.1840 by the Scottish engineer Alexander Nimmo and is in continuous use as a port for small fishing craft. 
See also Barnacle Geese at Ardboline Island, Raghly

I took this photograph near the harbour at Raghly in North Sligo just before sunset in March 2012.  The shot was taken from the water’s edge looking south-east towards Strandhill village and Coney Island.   Raghly has some of the best coastal views to be found anywhere in Ireland and leaves a photographer spoilt for choice. 

The last light of the evening sun created a lovely warm glow on the face of Knocknarea mountain.   Knocknarea is 327m high and is caped by a very impressive cairn which is over 10m high, one of the largest tombs of this type in Ireland. This cairn is know as Queen Meave's Grave and said to be the burial place of the legendary warrior Queen Meave of Connaught, buried upright on her horse in full battle regalia and facing her enemies from the north.  

To the left of this photograph you can see Blackrock Lighthouse which rises out of Sligo Bay just off Rosses Point. It  was originally a navigation beacon built in 1819 and was converted to a lighthouse in 1834.  The last lighthouse keeper left Blackrock Lighthouse in 1934 when the Lighthouse was automated.

Raghly Harbour itself was built in c.1840 by the Scottish engineer Alexander Nimmo and is in continuous use as a port for small fishing craft. 

See also Barnacle Geese at Yellow Strand, Raghly

 

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